A few models made with Lego bricks
As a kid, I had many sets of construction sets, but never Legos - they were just gaining in popularity about when I was outgrowing building blocks.
In 2014, I finally became addicted to the building blocks as a 'kid' in my mid-60s. I was working on the branding for JRW consulting and explored the option of building the logo out of Legos (a Lego Logo). I ordered hundreds of blocks from the website and had fun snapping the blocks together.




The JRW Lego logo
Legos, from the Danish leg godt, meaning “play well,” and one of the simplest and most iconic toys, were created by Ole Kirk Kristiansen. The first Lego bricks were hollow and could only be stacked (not locked together). They’ve twice been named “Toy of the Century”.
Lego bricks are beautifully engineered with very tight tolerances. The snap when sticking blocks together is quite satisfying. The first project was to build my logo out of Lego bricks:




From the Architecture Studio
After building my logo out of Legos, I got hooked on the blocks. I was tempted to get the Architect's Studio once at Barnes & Noble in Union Square - it was on sale but still expensive. I vetoed the notion at that time. Not long after that, I splurged and ordered the Architect's Studio online. The blocks are either white or clear, no other colors.


A Broadway Theater


That's a ballroom, cabaret theater, or restaurant above the seating area. A marquee is on the front wall. The ubiquitous NYC water tower is on the roof.

A stadium with Party Decks



An intimate thrust theater or theater-in-the-round



Grandstands for a major parade



From the Creator series




Lego Therapy
Because I ordered hundreds of dollars of bricks from the website, Lego had me on their mailing list. I regularly received the catalogs and perused them at the table while eating (I love to read stuff while I eat). I had admired the series of Victorian era buildings that might line Main Street in a Disney park. They were a bit too expensive for casual purchases. But, after selling a Manhattan apartment and while Manhattan, my favorite dog, was living with a terminal aggressive cancer, I needed a diversion. I had become a canine caretaker and stayed home a lot to feed and med dose the dog. Another catalog came. Uh, oh, now may be the time to order one and see how I like it. The kit arrived in just a few days and, I loved it. I was hooked. I set up a work area in the office and immersed myself in construction. The detail and engineering was impressive and surprising. Manhattan would lay on her bed in the office and watch me work. She stayed by my side a lot at that time. As the time to put her to sleep approached, I drove in the rain to the mall to buy a second building set. I worked on it that night. The next morning, she took her last nap. As therapy for grieving, I continued to work on the model. And bought 4 more sets.

Months later, in September, I needed more therapy - I had total shoulder replacement surgery. The Lego kits gave me projects to work on that could do with 1.5 hands.

Project dates
• JRW logo: Febuary-April 2014
• Architecture models: 2014/15?
• Detective's Office/Pool Hall: Wensday Jan 4-7 2017; ordered online.
• Parisian restraunt: Sunday Jan 15-18 2017; bought at mall on rainy Sunday, Manhattan's last full day.
Manhattan died: Monday, January 16, 11:10a.
Santa Fe with Brooklyn, Friday-Monday, Jan 20-23.
• Palace Theater: Tuesday Jan 24-25 2017; bought at mall on Tuesday.
• Brick Bank: Friday Jan 27-29 2017; ordered from car driving from Santa Fe on Monday.
• Assembly Square: Monday Jan 30 - Wens Feb 1 2017; bought at mall on Tuesday.
• Holiday Toy Shop: Friday Feb 3-4 2017; bought at mall on Thursday, Feb 2.
• Pet Shop: Tuesday March 21-23 2017; ordered online after BrickExpo downtown.
Prepping for shoulder surgery.
• Wine shop and crane: August 21-26 (pre-surgery); ordered online from China.
• Starbucks: September 27-30 - (post-surgery); ordered online from China.

www.jamesrobertwatson.com/lego.html