Jim Watson's naberhood in New York City
Battery Park City is located at the tip of Manhattan stretching along the Hudson River from Battery Park northward. This part of the Hudson River is where large ocean liners and freighters used to dock. The condo building sits where the Munargo Line piers for the United Fruit Company once were. The Titanic was scheduled to tie up at one of the piers farther upriver. After new modes of shipping and air travel took over, the piers lay dormant.

A Master Plan for a new mixed-use development was introduced in 1979. It was named Battery Park City after the park at the tip of Manhattan and the southern edge of the development. Compromising 92 acres along 1.2 miles of Hudson River waterfront, the population in 2004 was over 20,000.

When the World Trade Center basement was being dug, that dirt was simply trucked across the street and dumped into the Hudson. Walls had already been built to hold in the dirt. The Hudson Esplanade or Promenade lies atop that wall. The land is owned by the City of New York and is leased to the Battery Park City Development Company until about 2065. The land was divided into block parcels with each being sold to a different developer. The first development was completed in 1982. The large World Financial Center was begun in 1981 and completed by the late 80s. Many of the east-facing facades were scarred by debris from the falling twin towers in 2001. The WinterGarden; an indoor gathering, shopping, concert, and gallery space; was destroyed and completely rebuilt. The inner courtyard contains sixteen 45 foot tall palm trees.

My building is about three buildings to the right of the white boat on the right.


The apartment building is at the white dot.

The apt shows up in ad photos. These are all from New York magazine, March 2015.


Aerial views










How the entry from the WTC to Brookfield Place would have looked if the large staircase had been removed.


Legend to map letters

A Condo building
B Dog run for the dogs
C Hudson riverwalk
D South Cove park
E Ritz-Carlton Hotel & Skyscraper Museum. The hexagonal building is the Jewish Holocaust Museum
F West Street
G Former New York Athletic Club, home of the Heisman Trophy
H Entrance to tunnel under Battery Park
I Ventilation building for the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, also entry to the Men In Black HQ
J Entrance to the tunnel under bay to Brooklyn
K Broadway
L Bowling Green, oldest park in the country

Cove Club Condominium

The lobby hallway. Rendering of new furniture and wall color. Below: Game room and wifi/television.




Front and back of the condominium.

The back street, Cove Club is the third building from the left. World Financial Center is in the background. The plaza in front of the Jewish Holocaust Museum is named after Edmond somebody - fun to see OK home town in front of NY building.


Jim's balcony as seen from the roof deck.

Views from the balcony of Jim's apartment.



Views from the roof deck. Below: Thames Street in the snow. The Blizzard: January 2011










Immediate naberhood
The naberhood is very quiet (by New York City standards); the condo is on a cul-de-sac. There are only stop signs for the blocks around the condo. I refer to it as the suburbs - slower, quieter, greener, less stop lights. The streets are wide, clean, and well maintained with extensive landscaping throughout.




Marina at the World Financial Center.

A favorite restaurant at the WFC. Across the Hudson from the WFC is Jersey City. This is the really long escalator from the under-the-Hudson train to Jersey City.

This is a memorial to 9/11 in Jersey City.

One of the main reasons I bout a condo in Battery Park City is because of the Hudson Esplanade - a lavishly landscaped, meticulously maintained, and cleaned riverwalk along the Hudson perimeter of BPC. It is constantly and actively used by: strollers, bikers, joggers, dog walkers, sitters, contemplators, conversers, readers, photographers, boat watchers, fishers, dealmakers, phone talkers, and ponderers.


In this aerial view of lower Battery Park City, Battery Park is to the right and midtown is towards the upper left. The white dot is over my condo building. The rectangular indentation along the river wall is the South Cove. The hexagonal building is the Museum of Jewish Heritage.









South cove

There are over 20 public art projects in Battery Park City. One of those is South Cove, designed and built in 1988. Considered one of the country's most significant public artworks, it is a result of a unique collaboration between environmental artist Mary Miss, architect Stanton Eckstut (principal designer of the entire riverwalk), and landscape architect Susan Child. Including carefully sited rocks, natural plantings, atmospheric blue lights, water-racked pilings, and a large wooden jetty extending into the Hudson like a pier. The project provides a meditative respite from the city, an audio experience with the waves lapping or crashing onto the pilings and wooden structures. This park is right out the front door of the condo building.





Walking in the 'forest'. Buildings looking over the South Cove - my building is just out of the picture to the left.

An annual marathon swim around Manhattan Island. These are serious swimmers - it takes about 6 or 7 hours to go all the way around. Each swimmer is accompanied by a kayak and a motor boat. I had a long talk with the mother of the number-one ranked open water swimmer - that's her in the yellow cap.


Some other artwork along the riverwalk in Battery Park City. This sculpture is Rector Gate by R.M. Fischer. Built of steel, bronze, and granite, it rises 50 feet to form a gateway from the past to the future - part Gotham, part Metropolis. 1988.

The Upper Room by Ned Smyth, 1987. Dignified and playful, it is reminiscent of an Egyptian temple echoing the urban environment. Made of aggregate concrete with embedded colored glass, brass, and mosaic tiles.



Battery Park City
Located at the tip of Manhattan stretching along the Hudson River from Battery Park northward. This part of the Hudson River is where large ocean liners and freighters used to dock. The condo building sits where the Munargo Line piers for the United Fruit Company once were. The Titanic was scheduled to tie up at one of the piers farther upriver. After new modes of shipping and air travel took over, the piers lay dormant.

A Master Plan for a new mixed-use development was introduced in 1979. It was named Battery Park City after the park at the tip of Manhattan and the southern edge of the development. Compromising 92 acres along 1.2 miles of Hudson River waterfront, the population in 2004 was over 20,000.

When the World Trade Center basement was being dug, that dirt was simply trucked across the street and dumped into the Hudson. Walls had already been built to hold in the dirt. The Hudson Esplanade or Promenade lies atop that wall. The land is owned by the City of New York and is leased to the Battery Park City Development Company until about 2065. The land was divided into block parcels with each being sold to a different developer. The first development was completed in 1982. The large World Financial Center was begun in 1981 and completed by the late 80s. Many of the east-facing facades were scarred by debris from the falling twin towers in 2001. The WinterGarden; an indoor gathering, shopping, concert, and gallery space; was destroyed and completely rebuilt. The inner courtyard contains sixteen 45 foot tall palm trees.

Battery Park

Castle Clinton, fort built for the War of 1812, where Jenny Lind sang, former city aquarium, and immigration center before Ellis Island. New park landscaping.


Gazebo and gravel paths. Fountain jets - wet kid and wet dog.

Cyclist at sunset. Monument to lives lost in WWII.

The memorial to the Korean Conflict/War, flowers from the anniversary ceremony.



Pier A from Wagner Park at the tip of Manhattan.

Sunset on the Hudson from Battery Park. Closeup of the 'Colgate Clock' over in Jersey City.

The clock on the Jersey shore. It is the largest clock in the world. Although, there are reports of a larger clock being built in Dubai. Below: the clock in it's original location on top of the plant and office building.


StormSandy at Jim's apartment
Hurricane Sandy hit New Jersey and the East Coast on Monday night and Tuesday, October 29-30, 2012.

Red dots: locations of the fotos below.
Blue dot: Jim's apartment building.
Green dots: where reporters stood to broadcast.

Location 1. Along the Hudson Esplanade. At the South Cove pier.

Location 2: West Street at the entrance to the Brooklyn tunnel. After the water subsided, the wall in the adjacent parking garage showed the high water level.


Locations 2 & 3. The approach to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, under the parking garage and emerging from the garage.


Above and left: Location 4. Right: Location 5. The tunnel that connects the West Side highway to FDR Drive.



The blackout. Battery Park City is the lit-up section in the lower left.

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